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YouTube

YouTube's SafetyMode allows parents to restrict the content their children see. Here's our quick'n'dirty guide to setting it up.

Filtering

Google is often the first port of call for homework and curiosity of all kinds. Here's how to guard against adult content appearing in your children's Google searches.

Technology

What are children really seeing online? Do parental filters work? Our stats may surprise you...

Dog with iPad

Too many children have memories of dull ICT lessons acquiring skills that will probably be outdated by the time they start work. But the new computing curriculum, introduced this school year, is a really exciting (and world-leading) development. Simon Humphreys of Computing at School explains why.

Tearaway Unfolded

Where to go for information on the video games your children will ask for this Christmas.

Minecraft is phenomenally popular, especially with primary school children. Sometimes described as Lego for the digital age, it is absorbing, creative and educational - but, as with any online activity, it's as well to be aware of the basics of staying safe. Here's our guide to helping your child make the most of Minecraft.

In just a few years, Minecraft has become one of the world's most popular games, mainly by word of mouth and despite the lack of a big marketing budget or a major organisation behind it. Already a hot topic of conversation in the playground, Minecraft is now moving into the classroom, as teachers increasingly find ways to use the game for educational purposes. Here's the lowdown for parents. 

Ways the internet can be good for children and internet safety

We hear a lot about the negative effects on children of using the internet - but it can also be a positive thing...

Children need boundaries to make them feel safe - and to push against. This is as important online as off. The Parent Zone's Sophie Linington offers some tips on digital boundary-setting.

Covering eyes

If your child has come across something upsetting online - or something you think may be illegal - here's what to do about it.

What can you do if your child is talking online to someone they don't know in the real world and you're suspicious? What if you think they're being asked to do things, share images, encouraged to meet? CEOP - the Child Exploitation and Online Protection command of the National Crime Agency and one of the partners behind Parent Info - is the answer. This is how and where to report your concerns.

Elephant friends

There's some good news about young people's health (teen pregnancies down, smoking, drinking and drug taking down) but some not-so-good news (obesity and mental health problems up). A new report from Public Health England says that young people's mental and physical health are closely connected - and that relationships are the key to their health and wellbeing.

Stormy weather family

CEOP's tips for ways to start a conversation with your teenager – and where to take it after that.

Porn button

Pornography is more available than ever before, thanks to the internet. It can also be a hideously embarrassing subject to broach with your child. In this video, CEOP's Jonathan Baggaley offers some tips for opening non-awkward discussions.

Your child has come out. That’s great: it means that they feel confident about themselves and they are trusting you to be supportive.

But what do you actually say?

Rainbow steps

Is your child uncertain about their sexuality? Are you half-expecting some big 'coming out' announcement? Richard Essery of Brook offers advice for parents on how to respond.

underwear rule nspcc

The NSPCC explains how a simple conversation will help to keep your child safe from sexual abuse

Boys on a beach with wild waves

Abusers rely on secrecy. Here are the Lucy Faithfull Foundation's tips for things to look out for and how to respond.

Relationships

What is an abusive relationship? How do you spot when someone is trying to exercise too much control over you? And how to warn your child against relationships that are going to hurt them?

Broken black crayon, stick man drawing

The reality of abuse is rarely like the high-profile cases we hear about on the news. The Lucy Faithfull Foundation busts a few of the myths. 

People walking through woods

It's hard to think about the possiblity that someone we know might be an abuser or that a child may be being abused. But there are warning signs that can alert us to potentially abusive people and it's as well to be aware of them. Donald Findlater of the Lucy Faithfull Foundation explains what they are. 

Terrorism and trauma helping children cope

With graphic images being shown on the front pages of newspapers and on daily news bulletins, even very young children are exposed to upsetting information. 

Worried girl

It's estimated that around 290,000 children in the UK suffer from this debilitating condition. Here are some tips to help you help them.

Boys on mobile phones

How to help them cope and how to prevent it from happening again.

Would your child rather eat sweets than spaghetti bolognese? Do they assiduously avoid the broccoli on their plate? Would they rather run a five-mile marathon than entertain the idea of eating a courgette? We look into picky eating and how to help your child be more adventurous with food.

mindfulness in schools

Schools are increasingly turning to mindfulness as a way of helping pupils relax, concentrate, and avoid distractions. But what is it - and will it help?

healthy eating

Helping your child eat well and learn about healthy food is a crucial part of parenting, but sometimes it’s tricky to figure out what (and how much) they should eat. Consultant dietitian Lucy Jones offers her top tips.

New research from the University of Glasgow shows that eating in front of a screen could be bad news for your child's health. 

sleep hygeine

Most UK teens are chronically sleep deprived, leading to poor decision-making, difficulty concentrating and moodiness. Dr Pooky Knightsmith offers parents some help.

A staggering one in three children in the UK is overweight and one in five is obese. Weight can be very difficult to talk about - and raising it in the wrong way can be counter-producitve. Our guide to what obesity is, what it means in the long term and how to deal with it.

Mental health stigma

Natasha Devon, the government’s Mental Health Champion for Schools, offers advice on how to help your child.

Time to change image

1 in 10 children will experience a mental health problem - around three children in every classroom in the UK. A new campaign says it's time to do something to help them.

How to spot the signs and what you can do to help if your child is a sufferer.

Boy at desk

Did you know that, on average, three children in every classroom have a diagnosable mental health issue?

Crayon drawing

In this video, Claire Usiskin from YoungMinds talks about warning signs to look out for if you're concerned about your child's mental health - and what to do.

Silhouette

Is depression a fact of teenage life? What are the signs of depression and what can you do if you're concerned that your child may be depressed? Young Minds' Lucy Maddox offers some advice.

Good mental health

What does good mental health look like when it comes to young people?

Houses of Parliament

Are mental health problems rising in children and young people? And is the internet to blame? An influential committee of MPs calls for more support for mental illness among the young.

Black cloud

When young people admit to having mental health problems, parents often blame themselves. There is still stigma and shame attached to this kind of illness, despite the fact that it's so common. But early diagnosis and treatment have been shown to work so it's important for parents to be open and supportive. Blaming yourself - or anyone else - doesn't help.

online bullying Jedidja PD

Practical advice for parents of children who are being bullied or who are bullying someone else.

Child gaming online

Expert advice on how to cope with this common form of cyberbullying.

The word 'gay' gets bandied about all the time - 90% of students said they had used it to mean 'useless' or 'rubbish' at least once. Here, Stonewall, which runs a homophobic, biphobic and transphobic antibullying campaign, explains why this is hurtful and can inflict long-term damage. There are also tips for helping young people who have been affected by this kind of bullying; plus advice on making sure that your child doesn't become one of the bullies.

Homophobic, biphobic and transphobic bullying can be very painful but is extremely common. More than half of LGBT young people say they have been bullied at school. Here Stonewall offer some advice on how to help your child if they're on the receiving end and some sensible and sympathetic approaches if you find out that your child is among the bullies.

Jedidja

National children’s charity, Kidscape, offers parents tips on how to help their children sif they are being bullied.

Kidscape bullying

Top tips for children and young people from Kidscape.

helping hand

Scotland's anti-bullying service, Respect Me, offers parents advice on how to help children caught up in bullying behaviour

Bullying Scotland

Scotland's anti-bullying service, Respect Me, offers parents advice on how to help children caught up in bullying behaviour

Cyberbullying

Alex Holmes, the Diana Award anti-bullying programme manager, was previously a victim of bullying and now runs the anti-bullying ambassadors programme. In this video, he explains what cyberbullying is, why it hurts - and what you can do about it.

Bullying

Alex Holmes, anti-bullying manager for the Diana Awards, offers advice on how to recognise bullying and what to do if your child is affected.

Reaching out

Alex Holmes, anti-bullying programme manager for the Diana Award, outlines some useful things to do if your child is being bullied.

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