social media

We’ve answered some common questions about when your child is legally old enough to do some important things. 

Viral challenges continue to shape a lot of young people’s experiences online. fare harmless and just good fun, but some are more sinister and could pose risks. Here's what parents need to know.

Snapchat

Everything you need to know about the hugely popular picture sharing app.

Tablet

Most popular social media services don’t allow anyone under 13 to join. Even so, lots of younger children manage to set up accounts. What can you do?

You’ve probably heard of public shaming. It’s a centuries-old punishment, for anything from a crime to someone doing something others feel is morally wrong. But what is online shaming? And how does it differ?

Going online

A lot of sites and apps specify that users must be aged over 13. Why 13? Vicki Shotbolt explains and offers a guide to the age limits for various popular online activities.

Social media

‘Teens turn to, and are obsessed with whichever environment allows them to connect to friends. Most teens aren’t addicted to social media; if anything, they’re addicted to each other.’

Ask.fm

Ask.fm is anonymous and has been known to lead to cyberbullying and taunting. Here is CEOP’s guide to Ask.fm in a series of FAQs for parents.

Bullying

Alex Holmes, anti-bullying manager for the Diana Awards, offers advice on how to recognise bullying and what to do if your child is affected.

Online safety for children

Some tips on responsible – and safe – use of Instagram.

Online safety for children

Instagram is now bigger than Twitter. What's the big attraction? And is there anything you need to know?

12 year-old boy sitting and looking inscrutable

What goes online stays online. Some advice to help you and your child understand the long-term implications of publishing all about your life.

Looking out window

Sexting is almost the norm among some young people but sharing images of anyone under the age of 18 is illegal. So what should you say about sexting to your child? And how to respond if your child has sent an image they regret?

Camera

Sex plus the teenage urge to take risks plus the constant presence of a camera and a 'send' button - it's probably not surprising that a lot of young people think sexting is a perfectly normal part of modern teenage relationships. Is it? How often do things go wrong? What happens when images get spread beyond the boy or the girl they were meant for?

Texting

What is sexting? Is it illegal to share naked or partially naked images of young people? Why has it become such a common activity? And how do you alert your child to the risks?

Keeping safe on snapchat

How to be a bit more careful, and a bit better informed, when using Snapchat.

Keeping safe on snapchat

What do you need to know about Snapchat?