relationships

LGBTQ+

It’s important that children and teenagers feel able to talk to and relate to people as they grow up, so they can share experiences, develop their confidence and know that they’re not alone, but this can be particularly difficult for LGBTQ+ children and young people. Here, we look at some ways they can interact with their peers safely. By Parent Zone’s Yusuf Tamanna.

 
Elephant friends

There's some good news about young people's health (teen pregnancies down, smoking, drinking and drug taking down) but some not-so-good news (obesity and mental health problems up). A new report from Public Health England says that young people's mental and physical health are closely connected - and that relationships are the key to their health and wellbeing.

PUAs

So-called pick-up artists (PUAs) have been in the news recently.

Couple with umbrella

The issue of consent has recently been in the news: Cambridge University is considering introducing classes on consent after a high number of stude

Relationships

What is an abusive relationship? Follow this advice on how to warn your child against relationships that could be unhealthy

Face to face

It's hard to start conversations about sex and relationships. Some advice from Brook on things to think about before you launch into that difficult conversation about sex, contraception and safety.

Rainbow steps

Is your child uncertain about their sexuality? Are you half-expecting some big 'coming out' announcement? Richard Essery of Brook offers advice for parents on how to respond.

Holding hands

Brook is a charity that provides free and confidential advice for young people on sex and relationships. Here, Brook's Richard Essery answers questions from parents on how to talk to teens about sex.

Conversation bubbles

Justin Hancock, author of Talking To Teens About Sex, explains how to avoid stuttering about the birds and the bees

Camera

Sex plus the teenage urge to take risks plus the constant presence of a camera and a 'send' button - it's probably not surprising that a lot of young people think sexting is a perfectly normal part of modern teenage relationships. Is it? How often do things go wrong? What happens when images get spread beyond the boy or the girl they were meant for?